Thoughts on today’s 1Q84 reading

Great books make me want to leave their world two-thirds through, comforted by the knowledge I can return to their world later & all will be…

Mark Strand signed my favorite poem, “The Prediction” #edchat #engchat #poetry (Taken with instagram)

Mark Strand signed my favorite poem, “The Prediction” #edchat #engchat #poetry (Taken with instagram)

All’s I know is now, more than ever—at least to me—easy answers seem a lot less interesting than awesome questions. And, that feels important.
I am returning this otherwise good typing paper to you because someone has printed gibberish all over it and put your name at the top. ~English Professor (Name Unknown), Ohio University
Make customers as smart as you are.
For every effort a firm makes in educating itself about the customer, it should expend an equal effort in educating the customer. It’s a tough job being a consumer these days. Any help will be rewarded by loyalty. If you don’t educate your customer, someone else will—most likely someone not even a competitor. Almost any technology that is used to market to customers, such as data mining, or one-to-one techniques, can be flipped around to provide intelligence to the customer. No one is eager for a core dump, but if you can remember my trouser size, or suggest a movie that all my friends loved, or sort out my insurance needs, then you are making me smarter. The rule is simple: Whoever has the smartest customers wins.
The Messiness of “Why”

"What" is tangible…

"Why" is abstract…

"What" is a noun…

"Why" is a verb…

"What" is humanity….

"Why" is culture…

Suburban angles... “What” is finite…

"Why" is infinite…

"What" is a grade on a piece of paper…

"Why" is learning nuance and paradox…

"What" is a song on your iPod…

"Why" is music stirring long forgotten emotions…

"What" is the poem in your college literature anthology…

"Why" is lines six through eleven jumping into your mind while watching Modern Family….

….”Why” is AND.

….”Why” is WITH.

 
they (students) also need to understand that the purpose of punctuation is to express oneself more powerfully and imaginatively, to better communicate, not merely to be “correct.”
As we plan instruction—even instruction about punctuation—we have the opportunity to engage students’ minds and create new labels: question-asking, problem-solving. How we teach embeds a vision of who we think our kids are and what we think they are capable of. Are they destined for a future of critical thinking, questioning, revising the rules—or a future of compliance and rule-following?
We as designers strive for our solutions to be elegant, so what’s interesting about this story is how it seems to suggest that the most elegant solution, in certain situations, might not be creating anything new at all. Lightness is to be found in substitution or recomposing, not in rote addition.
kbkonnected:

“I’m So Much More Than Just a Teacher” (poster)
Go to BusyTeacher to print a copy for free.
#elemchat #spedchat #poster #teacherposter

kbkonnected:

“I’m So Much More Than Just a Teacher” (poster)

Go to BusyTeacher to print a copy for free.

#elemchat #spedchat #poster #teacherposter

Chomksy, of all people, ought to take note. When he defends his form of communicating (printed books and periodical essays) with claims that tweeting/texting lacks depth, he is implicitly suggesting that nonwhites and those in the Third World are inherently communicating less deeply than their white and first-world counterparts. He doesn’t seem to know enough about the reality of social media to examine his own assumptions.
Such marks are symptoms of an increasing tendency to punctuate for rhetorical rather than grammatical effect. Instead of presenting syntactical and logical relationships, punctuation reproduces the patterns of speech.
Fun with flash drives...
Me... handing a flash drive to student:I don't think there is anything on this...
RSP Student with major anxiety... If there's something sexy on it I want to see it...
Me... laughing out loud with my face hitting my desk...